10 tips for completing a 365 photo project

Boom! I managed to complete my 365 day project. For the uninitiated, that’s a photo every day for a year. All 365 days, ideally photographing something interesting, but definitely photographing something.

(It’s here if you want to check. The eagle-eyed may spot there are still a few missing; I’m almost done editing them and they’ll be up within a week, I just don’t follow my own advice as you’ll see at tip number 8.)

There were a few hairy moments on days when I nearly forgot to take a picture, there were lots of times I didn’t feel inspired and quite a few where I took a less than great photo, but it feels like a bit of an achievement to have challenged myself to ‘find’ a photo every day. And really, that’s what it’s about – the pictures are out there, you just have to find them. Which is easier on some days than it is on others.

161 the washing machine drum webTaking a photo every day for a year can be pretty tough going; lack of creative inspiration strikes often (at least it did with me), and it’s hard to keep going when you’re feeling ill, busy with work or forget until the last minute on any given day and end up taking a dreaded ‘panic photo’ of something really cruddy. Like the inside of your washing machine (see right for day 161’s effort).

It’s difficult to be inspired every day so it’s a case of forcing yourself to look at the world differently, to see the everyday things you might ordinarily walk past as potential photo subjects. To see the small things as well as the obvious ones, and rewiring your brain to see the world around you through your lens as well as your eyes. It’s definitely doable, just takes a bit of effort. And if I can manage it, so can anyone.

Random washing machine photos or not, finishing it means I have another completed project under my belt, a better understanding of my strengths as  photographer and (I think) a better eye for a photo as a result. I certainly have a better understanding of my camera. And doing the project inspired me to buy a new camera half way through the year – it’s much easier to justify an upgrade to yourself when you’re using it daily. So if you’re thinking about a 365 project, even though I’ve started off this blog post by whining on about how hard it’s been I’d definitely recommend it, and if you’ve just started one yourself – good luck, I hope you’ll agree when you finish it that it’s totally worthwhile.

I like to think I’ve learnt a few things along the way, so here are my tips for completing this photographic feat. If nothing else, it might be useful for me to refer back to in the future. I could do with following these tips a bit more.

1. Have your camera ready for action

196 spot the lady with no visible pants webI’ve put this first because, along with number 2, it’s probably the most important one, or at least the one which has made the most difference to my photos. There are many shots I wouldn’t have taken if my camera wasn’t ready around my neck or in my hand (with the strap safely secured round my wrist!). By the time you’ve gone through the faff of unzipping your bag, putting your camera strap round your neck and turning your camera on, the shot you were after might well have passed you by. A bit like this one would have done. It’s like Where’s Wally but with a lady who’s apparently forgotten to put any clothes on her lower half. (Even when you zoom right in there’s no evidence of underwear. Not that I’ve done that, obvs, because that would be weird.) It was taken at Waterloo Station while I was eating a sandwich.

Okay, it’s far from the best photo technically, but it made me chuckle when I took it. And but for a couple of seconds, it would never have been taken.

Obviously, to have your camera out, you have to have your camera with you at all times which can be a bit cumbersome. I ditched my handbag for the last few months of 2014 and got myself a decent rucksack to carry my kit around, which had a bonus of also being able to carry my laptop so I only had one bag when out and about with work. It was a bit of a standing joke with everyone I know that I always had this huge rucksack with me, and while you might feel a bit like a donkey lugging it around all the time, you’ll soon get used to it. Kind of. But at least I always had my camera with me. And as an added benefit I now have strong shoulders from carrying camera kit, a laptop, my purse, phone etc. on my back everywhere. Hee-haw.

2. Set several reminders

173 gutter and drainpipe web

I had reminders set on my phone at four different times every day to make sure I remembered to take a shot, the last being at 9pm when my phone would remind me ‘last chance to take a photo!’. You’ll get into a habit at some point, but it’s always good to have something other than memory alone to help you along, as there will be days when you’ll forget and have a last minute panic. A bit like this drainpipe shot. Nice. And it would be a shame to miss a day when you’ve gone to so much effort, which would have been guaranteed for me without reminders.

3. Take photos early in the day

149 a lost umbrella web

You can always take another later, but you might regret not taking one as a fall back in case something comes up later and stops you taking more, so have a ‘banker’, and take it early.

One day in the summer I was travelling to the Kent seaside with work – so lots of opportunity to take some nice shots when I got there – but I still took this photo of a discarded umbrella in the street next to the office in Manchester first thing in the morning. I’m glad I did; it turned out I was a week early and not due in Kent until the following week. I discovered this just in time to avoid boarding the train with my luggage at Piccadilly station. Fail.

So if I hadn’t taken this shot when I did, I’d have missed it, and who knows what I’d have ended up with instead. It certainly wouldn’t have been a view of Kent.

4. Take random shots when you need inspiration

266 top of Oldham Street web

It sounds a bit weird, but I found that pointing my camera at anything and pressing the shutter button – even if my first few were not really photographs but views of nothing in particular – seemed to spark the photographer in me and suddenly I’d start seeing potential photos. Once I’d got going and broken the ‘I need to take a shot of something’ mental barrier, I’d usually find something that was actually worth taking a photo of. So get snapping and something might just turn up.

The shot above was taken within a 5 minute walk from my office, at the top of a street while I was in a bit of a hurry to get a photo done before heading back to work. I started taking (pretty uninspiring) photos of the traffic on the main road and then turned around and wondered whether I could make something interesting out of the building column and blurred poster behind me. Getting in quite close and fiddling with the depth of field resulted in an abstract image and I quite like the contrast in shape and colour in it.

5. Find the unfamiliar in the familiar

204 relief in wall of Fred Aldous Lever Street web

Look at familiar things, the ones you might see every day and walk right past, from new or interesting points of view. Looking at the world straight on and at eye-level is pretty restrictive because you always have the same viewpoint; looking up and down as you walk around can show you things you’ve never noticed before.

This photo is part of the brick relief near a shop literally 100 yards from my office. I’d never noticed it before and wouldn’t have done if I wasn’t scouring the floor for something to photograph. I lay on the floor to take this shot – something I wish I’d done more of with some of my other shots to get interesting angles. That’s not to be recommended though when you’re wearing white jeans (as I was). I guess that’s what tripods are for.

Views from the top of multi-storey car parks can also make for interesting shots of cityscapes (although be aware some are private property so check as you don’t want to be booted out), as can looking down out of a second or third (or more) storey window onto the street. When you think about it, there are actually loads of opportunities for shots with a new perspective.

 6. Take photos that mean something to you

278 possible badger toilet in the front garden web

There have been times during the year when I’ve not included photos of occasions or people which with hindsight, I’d change if I did this project again. I’ve looked for technically good photos at the expense of photos that may not be perfect, but which I’ll look back on and be glad I documented as part of my life. So don’t just think about this as an artistic or improvement project, think about it as a record of what’s going on for you, of your surroundings and your view of the world. That’s part of the reason at one point I decided to do a self portrait. I hated taking it at the time (I’m still not mad on it), but in a few years’ time when I have a few more wrinkles I might be glad I included it. We’ll see.

The above shot of a suspected badger toilet in our front garden means nothing to anyone except me, but it will remind me of the badgers we saw sneaking down our street a couple of times late at night – not something I ever expected to see in the suburbs of Manchester. We nicknamed one of the badgers ‘dirty Mike’, but that’s probably for another blog post…

7. There’s always time to take a photo

073 Milton Keynes resized

So many times I’ve had a really short window to get a picture, I’ve been convinced I won’t find anything interesting. What is there to see in a 5 minute walk around the block to get a sandwich? But sometimes limiting yourself means you have to be creative and really open to spontaneous – and fleeting – images.

The above shot was taken in Milton Keynes on the way back to the train station after a meeting. I didn’t have time to stop and set up a shot, but because I had my camera around my neck (see 1) as we were walking past this water feature I was able to quickly capture three people walking past. It’s great when you have lots of time but 10 seconds might be all you need for a photo, you just have to be looking for it – and ready when it turns up.

8. Keep on top of your editing

269 on the tube web

This one’s a bit rich coming from me because I still haven’t got all 365 pictures up on here, although I’m getting there (maybe one of my rules should be follow your own rules). I started off badly and quickly got behind with my editing, ending up with such a big backlog it became unwieldy which then made me put it off even longer. I had over four months’ worth at one stage to sort out and it felt like such a huge task I didn’t want to face it! Try to have a set time e.g. once a week to get them updated, because if you have a habit and routine you might avoid a photo editing meltdown.

Being a bit more selective about shots and moving around more is something else I’ve learnt to think about. While popping off a few shots is good to get you started (see 4), taking lots of shots of the same thing or from slightly different angles does nothing to improve your photography or create more interesting shots. It takes up space on your hard drive and makes it a longer process to edit, so cull obvious duff shots in camera, and then do the same again as soon as you save them onto your hard drive. And move around a bit more when you’re shooting – try some different angles (see 5).

9. Don’t over-analyse your shots

113 sunset in Wales web

You could spend ages agonising over your shots when you’re choosing ‘the one’ to represent the day, especially if you’ve taken a lot of shots or got a few you particularly like. If I did this project again, I’d spend less time procrastinating about ‘the one’ (searching for ‘the one’ can become a bit of ‘a thing’ if you’re not careful), and pick my favourites on gut instinct.

There are some shots I look back at now and I wish I’d chosen another photo from that day as ‘the one’. But I could revisit them again next year and have a different view again. Or I could just accept that I chose what felt right at the time. I had a couple of hundred versions of the sunset above, from slightly different angles and with slightly different lighting. But really, one’s much the same as another. And just because you pick it to represent the day, it’s not like committing to it for life or anything, so keep it in perspective.

On a related note, you could also spend ages editing your pictures and I wouldn’t recommend that either. I didn’t, partly because I’m not as good at post-processing as I’d like to be, but partly because I’m trying to create better shots in camera. I’ve tended to limit any editing to a basic touch of contrast and slight colour boost, the occasional crop and a few black & white conversions, but looking at my images in a fairly ‘raw’ format means I can spot things I’d change in future. It also means catching up on a backlog of images is more achievable as each one is quick to process (see number 8).

10. Challenge yourself

019 Sadie at 364 days old resized

Review your photos regularly to check you’re not photographing the same kinds of things, and challenge yourself to take different types of shots (this is significantly easier if you keep on top of your editing, see 8). Architecture, abstracts, people, shapes and patterns featured quite a lot for me although I made a conscious effort to go out and take different types of photos. Sometimes I’d only take one lens with me, e.g. my 70-300, or just a 100mm, to encourage a bit of creativity. This experimentation will also help you work out what sort of photos you enjoy taking – and are best at. I wish I’d taken more portraits, so that’s one goal for 2015.

And so to 2015…

This year I’m doing another 52 week project, rather than a 365. I decided one year was enough to do it every day, but I was keen to carry on with some kind of ongoing project. So I’m doing a mixture of either taking a new photo every week, or trying a new post-processing technique on existing photos. It takes a bit of pressure off for new pics, but also means I’m still learning new skills. You can have a gander at how I’m getting on here. I’m determined to follow my own advice and stay on top of the editing this year, but we’ll see how that goes.

If you’re starting a project, or if you’ve done one yourself, what are your tips for getting through it?

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Better late than never: time-lapse of day 5 of 365

I’ve finally got round to editing a load of outstanding photos from the 365 day project, not least this one from way back on day 5.

I decided to experiment by doing some time-lapse shots, but promptly afterwards my laptop packed in and I didn’t have any software to create it. Better late than never, and not too bad as a first attempt, although I definitely need to work out how to remove the word art from the title fonts…what’s wrong with a plain font?

 

 

10 tips for completing a 365 day photography project

I’ve been a bit quiet on the blogging front for the last few weeks, but having made it through to the middle of March I’m still up to date on the 365 day project, most of which I’ve now uploaded here.

It’s worth reflecting on what I’ve learnt so far, especially since it’s getting harder to come up with ideas the more the year continues.  It may seem a bit premature to be offering advice on completing something I haven’t actually completed yet, but I’m going to do it anyway and keep my fingers crossed that I do finish it. If not, feel free to ignore any/all advice that follows because if I fail then I clearly didn’t know what I was talking about in the first place. Either way, here are 10 tips which are helping me get through the project (so far), but do add yours in the comments below, I could probably do with more than 10 tips to get me to the end of the year!

034 Manchester skyline resized1. Take your photos early in the day. You can always take more later but you never know what might come up during the day which could stop you taking a photo, even if you have the best intentions. Better to have something you can improve on than nothing at all.

2. Have your camera with you all the time. I’ve lugged mine around everywhere with me this year, and with some of the travelling I do for work this has meant carrying four bags including a laptop and overnight case halfway across the country and back. But although it’s not particularly convenient, you get used to it after a few weeks, and if you don’t have it with you, you can guarantee you’ll find a perfect photo opportunity which your phone camera really won’t do justice to.

3. As well as having your camera with you, have it out, so you’re always ready for action. Hang it round your neck or tie it around your wrist. Then you’re always ready to go if you spot something worth photographing; if you keep it in your bag, by the time you’ve got it out and set up, the moment might have gone.

4. Keep your battery charged (ideally, carry a spare) and make sure your memory card  is in your camera.  Yes I know this is obvious, but on more than one occasion I’ve  gone out to take photos and left my card  in my laptop from earlier editing/uploading. Which is very dumb but also very annoying.

055 Police museum resized5. Keep on top of the editing. I’m not doing particularly well at this, and I’ve uploaded over 20 photos today which I’ve barely edited at all. On the plus side, not sorting them out for a few weeks makes you quite ruthless – I don’t want to spend hours all at once editing and deciding on which photo to use so it’s made me quicker at deciding what makes the cut. But it wasn’t ideal to do so many at once, I reckon a week’s worth at a time is a manageable number (for me, anyway).

6. Keep a  list of random ideas for photos which you can go back to on days when you have no inspiration or are really pushed for time. I have a proper notebook which I tend to leave all over the place, so I also use the Evernote app on my mobile to jot down ideas (other note apps are available!).

7. Convince yourself anything can be a potential photo, whether it’s the road in front of you or the building you work in. This forces you to think differently about the things you see everyday. Can you find an unusual viewpoint of a familiar subject, or create abstract patterns in the ‘ordinary’?

8. Go back  to places you’ve already visited to help you improve. Often I’ll have a wander around Manchester at dinner time and take photos of a few different things. The ones I don’t use I’ll re-shoot on different days, by analysing what didn’t work the first time and (hopefully) making them better second time around.

058 looking up a wall resized

9. Look up. I’ve found you can create some interesting shapes by photographing buildings at odd angles. I seem to be a fan of abstracts and patterns judging by some of the pictures I’ve taken. Or maybe I just find it easier to see a potential for a photo that way.

070 St Paul's Cathedral resized

10. Spot patterns in your work and see where you can stretch yourself. I’ve noticed there are certain things I photograph which are very similar (like shapes and buildings), so I need to experiment a bit more with different styles. In London the other night I photographed St Paul’s Cathedral, but feeling a bit underwhelmed with my pictures – and not having a tripod to take a decent shot with a slow enough shutter speed at night – I decided to play around with my lens by turning it as the shutter was depressed. At least it hid any blur from resting the camera on a bush! Experimenting with turning your lens or deliberately defocusing a shot are ways of creating a more abstract photo. And you could try re-taking scenes you’ve already photographed using these kinds of techniques, resulting in some really interesting images.  I haven’t done that yet, but definitely intend to as it’ll give me a way of setting up a photo on days when I’m  struggling for other inspiration. And anything which helps that has got to be a good thing.

Share your own tips below!

Days 27-29 of 365 – month one almost complete!

Well, we’re on the home run. For January, at least; only two days to go and I’ve completed 1/12 of the 365 day project. Woop woop! It feels a bit like the juice diet did after the first few days – I’ve got this far, so I’m going to finish it! But unlike the juice diet, I don’t have to abstain from food at the same time. Or alcohol, which is probably more to the point.

On Monday we celebrated the life of my late Granddad, Derek – or Bill, as he was known to his family and friends. Having decided it was inappropriate to take my camera to the funeral (or, having been instructed so by my other half), I took a photo later instead of the order of service, to mark the (sad) occasion in my project so that when I look back over the year, I’ve captured all of the significant events (happy or sad), as well as the everyday ones. [Just to clarify, I wouldn’t have been taking photos at the funeral, it would have been afterwards at the pub, I’m not totally odd. With hindsight, I could have used my phone to take a photo, but it didn’t occur to me at the time.]

027 Granddad Williams resizedYesterday I went out for lunch with two ladies I met through Good for Nothing a couple of months ago. This was taken in Pop Cafe where we ate. I probably should have used a smaller aperture to get more of the foreground in focus. Or maybe set the focus manually. Or both. But I like the way it’s captured the lady in the background, as well as the fact that I took this from where I was sitting, and immediately spotted the potential photo when I got my camera out. It’s true, this 365 thing does make you look at things a bit differently.

028 Pop cafe resized

I took this photo of an alley and bins this morning on the way into work. It’s a shot I tried last week, although when I got to work and looked at it on screen I decided I didn’t like it, so went out at lunch to do some street photography instead. I got a bit lower down today to take this, and I think the angle is better. I was trying to draw the viewer into the photo, past the bins and the bin bag on the cobbles, and down the alley towards the entrance way in the distance. I think it kind of works. And while a dark alley might not be the most obvious choice for a photo, I think there are pictures in even the most mundane, everyday things, those we don’t pay much attention to most of the time. We just need to be looking out for them.

029 Manchester alley resized

Project 365 days 23-26: landscapes, birds and points of view

On Thursday I went to an ‘alternative camera club’ at Selfridges in Manchester, as part of the Festival of Imagination. We were given a brief to take a photo with our mobiles, the brief being ‘a photo with a point of view’. These sunglasses don’t really have a point of view until worn, at which point they’ll all have different points of view. And I liked the repetition of the pattern. This is the first picture I’ve taken with my phone for this project, and it’s a bit blurry, but I included it so it reminds me about the day I went wandering around Selfridges at lunchtime taking photos.

023 a point of view resizedI had the afternoon off on Friday to go and pick up the new car, so after I finished work I took a tram up to Salford Quays to meet the other half so we could set off. I took a few different shots of birds and various bits of architecture while I was waiting, and even found steps can make an interesting abstract shot. I think my favourite picture of the day is of the bird in the water because although it’s not quite as sharp as I’d like, I like the way the water looks and the bird’s reflection, which I didn’t notice I’d captured until later.

Yesterday we had a drive over Woodhead pass and back over Snake pass. This was taken on the road off Woodhead on the way to Holmfirth.

025 Woodhead pass resized

Today we had a run out to Blackpool. It was raining and very windy so we spent more time in the arcades than on the front. I did a black and white conversion to this photo of the beach and pier, which I think suited the cold weather (and is my photo for today), although the clown in the arcade has an almost sinister look to it in black and white.

See the full 365 day project here.

 

Portraits, shooting from the hip and various other photo experiments – days 14-22 of 365

A bumper crop today as I have some catching up to do. So far I’ve remembered to take a photo every day, I just need to get better at writing down a few thoughts about them and getting them on here! I’ve tried to use a few techniques in the last week or so, to test myself and see how varied I can make my photos. I’m fairly pleased with the results, and already I think it’s helping me improve my photography.

Day 14 was a close up of a pineapple. I used an external flash attached to the camera as it was taken at home in the evening with no natural light. I wanted to create an abstract pattern from the shapes, but a tighter crop might have worked better as you can see the rounded edges at the side. I haven’t re-edited because I’ve made myself a rule of not going back and fiddling after I’ve done an initial edit (I’d cropped it a bit already), just to keep momentum going or I don’t think I’ll ever get to the end of the project.

014 pineapple resizedDay 15 is a reflection of a building in a puddle in the Northern Quarter in Manchester, taken at lunchtime. The colours could do with being a bit more saturated but I don’t seem to have mastered puddle photos yet – one to practice a bit more.

015 Manchester puddles resizedDay 16 was taken looking out of our office window first thing in the morning. I liked the contrast of the dark and the bright street light. And it was the best of the bunch – the rest were either wonky or a bit out of focus.

016 one way resizedLast Friday was day 17, and I went to a voiceover recording as part of a video we’re making at work. We recorded at a home studio in Heaton Moor, and it was great seeing Rowan, the actress who played our narrator, in action using the script I’d written. Rowan said she’d have a look at my photos so Rowan, if you’re reading this, I didn’t choose one with you in it because they were a bit blurred – sorrrryyy! It’s nothing personal, but this was the best of the bunch. I should have taken a few more, and got some close ups really to get some better variation, but you live and learn I suppose.

017 in the recording studio - we're missing the sound guy resizedI bought a car on Saturday and despite lugging my camera all the way to Derby (and back) and having cars and all sorts to photograph, I managed to avoid taking a photo all day. So this is one of Kev the parrot, taken using a flash. It was only afterwards I realised I’ve already featured Kev in this project, I just haven’t posted it up yet as I need to convert it but don’t have the software at the moment. Oops. Note to self – no more Kev photos for a good while! At least I have the tortoises for all fall-back next time, they haven’t appeared here yet…

018 Kev the parrot resizedOn Sunday, I went to visit my niece Sadie, to drop off her birthday present. I cropped this shot to remove some of the background and get quite a close up of her face, and converted it to black and white as the phone cover she was holding was pink and very distracting. I like the fact I managed to get the light reflections in her eye – which was more by luck than design, but that’ll do me! This is probably my favourite of the batch. It’d be even better if both eyes were in focus.

019 Sadie at 364 days old resized

On Monday it was back to work and another lunchtime trip around the Northern Quarter. I chose this picture because although it’s slightly out of focus – I did the old ‘shooting from the hip’ thing, sneaky sneaky like – I liked the way it was framed. Who is the person with the coffee? I don’t even know myself, I didn’t really notice them. I was just snapping away at everyone I walked past. You need a lot of attempts to get anything decent with this type of photography; I mainly end up with pavements or buildings, rather than actually getting people in the shot!

020 coffee time resizedYesterday I decided to have another bash at a bit of street photography, sneaky sneaky style, so again I tied my camera around my wrist, and stood in Piccadilly Gardens for 20 minutes, snapping away. I ended up with a couple of decent shots, but chose this one because the subject looks like she’s looking straight at me while I’m taking her photo. Which is sort of true, but not quite because can’t have known  I was taking the photo since I was actually looking the other way as I took the shot 🙂

021 I might have been spotted resizedAnd today I walked out of the building at work, looked up and spotted these patterns on the façade of the building, directly overhead. I’d never even noticed the arrows before, shows you what you notice when you actually bother noticing. And it saved me a walk around town trying to find another photo – job done straight away. I still can’t decide whether it would have been better to have more of it in focus, or whether I like the blur. Too late to change it now anyway.

022 arrows pointing resized

 

 

 

Can plug sockets make a decent photo?

I’ll leave you to answer that question, but I’ve had to open my mind to think just about anything can be the subject of a photo if I’m going to really improve my photography skills, and stick at this 365 day thing. Whether anything (including a number of lonely plug sockets) can be an interesting or decent photo is another matter though.

This was taken in the empty office which is next to ours at work. I liked the regularity of the pattern and tried this shot from a few different angles – straight on was a bit dull, although I quite liked the shapes and the symmetry. I decided this angle with the blurring effect was the best of the ones I took. I also liked the suggestion that the plugs go on forever (they don’t, that would be a pretty weird set-up for most offices, even empty ones).

013 plug sockets resized

A fruity theme for day 12: apples and the penultimate day of juicing

Today is the penultimate day of my 7 day juice diet. I’ve not eaten any solid food since last Monday night and I finish my diet of exclusively fruit and veg, juiced up, this Monday. I thought one of my 365 photos should commemorate my ‘juicing’ phase of the year, especially since I’ve almost finished it.

I wanted to try to break some of my bad eating (and drinking) habits, and decided I needed to do something fairly drastic if I was going to have any chance of it working – I’ve been reading a lot about habits recently and realised I needed to change my routines quite significantly to have a good chance of having a long-term impact on my diet. So I decided to try a 7 day juicing plan. No takeaways, no ready meals, no alcohol, no caffeine, just fruit and veg, some supplements like wheatgrass and spirulina ,and a small amount of yoghurt. 

It’s actually not been as difficult as I thought it would be, although it’s been hard not having any wine or a curry this weekend, as I ALWAYS have a curry on a Saturday. But not this week. Just as well the diet’s been working and the juices do actually fill you up, otherwise I think I’d have cheated…

012 apples resized

I had to go shopping today for some last juicy provisions, mainly apples, as you can probably see. When I got home, I peered into the shopping bag on the floor using a 50mm lens, and because I took it in the kitchen this afternoon when it was quite overcast, I used a separate flash (not the built in one) rather than turning on the strip light in the kitchen, so I could control the colour and light tone a bit more (I bounced the light off the wall). 

I must have eaten – or drunk – about 80 apples, as well copious amounts of other fruit and veg in the last few days, so I’ve definitely been getting more than my 5 a day. But I’m still really looking forward to having a curry next Saturday. The real test will be whether I make any changes longer-term, although I’ve just invested in a blender after discovering some really nice smoothies, so maybe breakfasts in future will consist of fewer cheese toasties and more fruit and yoghurt. I’ll have to treat myself to a toastie this week though; with the amount of cheese I usually eat I’m surprised I haven’t had cheese withdrawal symptoms in the last few days.

A transport theme for days 9 & 10

Yesterday I walked to the top of a multi-story car park round the corner from work to get some nice views of Manchester’s skyline. I wasn’t particularly inspired by anything but as I was on the 11th floor, I started looking down to see whether I could get an interesting or unusual view on something, rather than photographing a building.

I decided this close up view from above of two bike seats might make an interesting photo. Just as well I took it anyway, as I was moved on by a security guard shortly after.

010 bikes from above resized

I’ve added a bit of posterization and upped the contrast in post-processing.

Today I had a drive over to Wakefield to look at a new car, so I took this photo at the showroom. I decided to capture a reflection in the badge of this Renault – this isn’t the car I went to look at, but it caught the light and reflection well as I walked past it.

011 car reflections resized

Day 9 of 365

Day 9 was taken early this morning at 35 Dale Street. I liked the lighting on the building, and was also quite chuffed with myself for getting it taken so early on (before 7.30am). No editing except a slight crop – I’m trying to avoid doing much post-processing, partly out of necessity (broken laptop) and partly for speed and to really test myself.

009 35 Dale Street resized